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. thater, not in the ways many people think. in my home state of alabama, passing the law had far reaching affects on all of these areas. this law impacted groups and people economically and socially as well. butcting not just alabama america as a whole. >> well, the issue from farmers is that they have a need for seasonal workers often times. buttimes year around seasonal workers to do jobs they can't find local employees to perform. they have found that since the immigration law passed a lot of migrant workers they depended on the past left the state, some of those that had proper documentation left because of fear of being maybe misunderstood, their status being misunderstood or they had family members that did not have the proper documentation. >> one of the things that became an issue in law enforcement, there is a direct tie between illegal immigration and the drug cartel in the united states. alabama is a border state. wehappen to border water, border the gulf of mexico. particularly in southern alabama, we're a pipeline for narcotics coming into the united states, predominantly out
-56 law had far-reaching effects in all of these areas. this law impacted many groups and people, not just economically, but socially as well, reflecting not just alabama, but america as a whole. >> well, the issue for farmers is that they have a need for seasonal workers oftentimes. sometimes year round, but seasonal workers to do jobs that often times they can't find local employees to perform. they have found that since the immigration law has passed that a lot of migrant workers they have depended upon have actually left the state, even some of those that had proper documentation, they left because of fear of being maybe misunderstood, their status being misunderstood, or they didn't understand the law or maybe they had family members that dent have the proper documentation. >> i think one of the things that really became an issue in law enforcement is there is a direct tie between some illegal immigration into the drug cartels and the drug industry in the united states, alabama is a border state. we just happen to border wart. we border the gulf of mexico. but particularly i
&t. it is a group of interested people who want changes in our electronic medications privacy ions privacyuniat law. we need to updated. the last time the electronic communications privacy act was updated was in 1986. a lot has changed. does theind of access government have to our e-mails today? >> right now it is not treated like regular snail mail. .hey can go into it we need to update the law to go alongside the changes of .echnology instead of sending letters, we sent e-mails. of keeping the letter in your pocket or at your home, you might store it in the cloud. we can do that. we have updated these from time to time. technology changes. they have to do this more often because technology has been changing quicker. you can send someone an e-mail. that is like sending someone a letter. it is the same thing. the fourth amendment is still there. >> also joining our roundtable is from the roundtable. -- from the hill. >> why do you think this is important? >> americans for tax reform have always been interested in regulating the internet and telecommunications. everything that deals with the size of
. >>host: at american university professor t. levin "the spirit of the law" what do you mean when you talk about the old constitutional world and a new constitutional world with religion? >>guest: for most of our nation's history it is the state's that controlled access to rights of religious organizations and so on and tear of the decades that began to shift as the supreme court applies the national constitutional establishment and free exercise clauses of the first amendment against the state to have a centralizing debate against religion. >>host: of the state's have controls we have freedom of religion. >>guest: yes but the first amendment begins congress shall enact no laws and directed only to the national government. >>host: were there restrictions? >> yes. several states had religious establishments than most limited the amount of property they could own, as some tax religious property others would not let have group practices sandy eventually various states in the southwest banning polygamy for example,. >>host: with massachusetts or pennsylvania as a case study of states regulatin
communications privacy laws. and we need to update those laws. the last time the electronics communications privacy act was updated was in 1986, and a lot has changed since then. >> host: grover norquist, what kind of access do law enforcement officials, the government, have to our e-mails right now? >> guest: it's not traded as if it's regular snail mail. they can go into it if it's been parked with a third party, put in the cloud. what we need to do is just update the law to go alongside the changes in technology instead of sending each other letters, we send each other e-mail. instead of keeping your letter in your pocket or your home, you may store it in a cloud somewhere. and that needs to have the same privacy that your regular snail mail does when the post office delivers something, and we can do that. we've updated these from time to time as technology changings. they have to do this more often because technology's been changing quicker. but you send someone an e-mail, it's like sending them a relater. it's the -- letter. it's the same thing. the fourth amendment is still there, and
over an hour. >> good evening. i am the director of the yale law library and i'm here to welcome you to the booktalk series. i also want to thank the federalist society are cosponsoring tonight's talk. tonight's program features logan beirne, the author of a new book entitled "blood of tyrants: george washington and the forging of the presidency." very much a yellow school boat. it began as a paper while logan was a law student at the under the supervision of eskridge. after graduation from law school in 2008, working at the law firm, he returned to yellow school in 2010 and begin turning the paper into the book we feature tonight. appropriately we have professor eskridge to comment on the boat. he's a highly distinguished member of the outlawed school faculty. the author of numerous casebook, monographs and articles covering a wide range of topics in several books have been featured by air they breathe. according to a recently published study of kali, fred shapiro, professor asters one of the most cited in a note universe. i think that was probably a mistake. william eskridge is a d
privacy laws and we need to update those laws. the last time the electronics communications privacy act was updated was in 1986 and a lot has changed since then. >> host: grover norquist what kind of access to law enforcement officials in the government have to our e-mails today? >> guest: right now it's not treated as if it's regular mail, snail mail. they can go into it as a third-party and put it up on the cloud. what we need to do is update the law to go alongside the changes in technologies that are sending each other letters. we send each other e-mails instead of keeping europe letter in your pocket you may stored in the cloud somewhere and that's should have the same privacy that you regular snail mail does in the post office delivering something and if we can do that. we have updated this from time to time, the technology changes. the technology has been changing quicker but to send someone an e-mail is like sending them a letter. it's the same thing. the fourth amendment is still there. >> host: also joining our roundtable today is -- of the hill newspaper. >> my first question
laws that will appeal to both sides. the senator's in miami this morning. senator, good morning. >> good morning. >> schieffer: let me just make sure first, do you-- have you agreed with the gang of eight? are you all together on this proposal and when will you unveil it? >> first of all, it's important to understand we're not agreeing to a press release. we're agreeing to a bill, a piece of legislation. we have agreed to the principles will of a piece of legislation. they're still being drafted. i would say, obviously, if the draft looks what we agree to i look forward to talking about it later this week about it. i'm very optimistic about it. >> schieffer: senator, i think the most important part of it, what happens to the 11 million immigrants in this country illegally? what happens to them. >> right, yeah. first of all, i think it's important to point out this is not a theory. they are actually here. we are not talking about brings millions of people here illegally. they are here now and they are going to be here for rest of their lives. the proposal in the past some advocat
second amendment rights and the second amendment rights of our law-abiding law-ag citizens. we have seen the newtown parents here in washington bravely telling their stories. they deserve better than this body turning their backs on them. the families of aurora deserve better than this body turning their backs on them. the families of more than 30 people who die every single day at the hands of gun violence deserve more from this body. my friends, it is simply time to act. today is the day for this body to show the american people that their voices matter. that when 90% of americans demand us to expand background checks, that we can deliver. we should be able to agree today that we no longer need military-style weapons and ammunition clips on our streets. and we should be able to agree today that it's time to crack down on the illegal handguns being trafficked in our streets into the hands of criminals. four years ago, i met the parents of naisha pryor yard. naisha was a beautiful 17-year-old honor student killed in the prime of her life by an illegal handgun when she was just spending t
of american exceptionalism and another component is free capitalism and the rule of law. it says in our constitution, the constitution itself is the supreme law of the land. and we must abide by the consfution, the language in it. and the language in the constitution isn't something that can be redefined away from us, but instead, mr. speaker, it is a written contract, it's a contract from the generations that ratified the constitution and the subsequent amendments to the succeeding generations. our charge is to preserve, defend and protect the constitution of the united states and if we find that the wisdom of our predecessors didn't foresee circumstances in the current era we are, we have to defend always the language of the constitution and the understanding of the meaning of that language at the time of ratification, but instead have enough courage to amend the tools and use the constitution. the supreme law of the land. the rule of law is an essential pillar of american exceptionalism. without it, we wouldn't have a reason to uphold the constitution. and i often speak to groups of
and use tax laws and for other purposes. mr. reid: mr. president, i would object to any further proceedings in regard to this bill. the presiding officer: objection having been heard, the bill will be placed on the calendar. mr. reid: mr. president, today this august body will honor the memory of 20 first-grade children, little babies who were gunned down, most of them shot multiple times. we will also honor the teachers and administrators who were killed that day in newtown, connecticut. but we're also going to honor with this legislation tens of thousands of others who were killed by guns each year here in america. we're going to do that by voting on a number of measures to strengthen the laws to prevent gun violence in this nation. mr. president, the families of innocents killed in newtown, aurora, in carson city, blacksburg, in oak creek and columbine really deserve these votes. where do i stand on these democratic proposals? this afternoon the senate will vote on a compromised background check proposal crafted by senators manchin, toomey, kirk and schumer, all experienced l
a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's
this weeks as victims' families have been attending the debate on the proposed gun law. some others, mitch mcconnell and mike lee says it's not getting to the heart of the problem. government shouldn't punish law abiding citizens that exercise second amendment rights and this legislation is more like an band-aid not addressing regulations. >> my concern it restricts the rights of law abiding citizens and doesn't do anything to deter the kind of gun violence that occurred at sandy hook which all of us would like to eliminate. this is kind of law that is confusing and vague for law abiding, but very easy for criminals to get around. >> the senate zbtd scheduled to begin on tuesday. even though the senators did vote 68-31 to allow the debate to begin there are still ways members could stall the final passage of bill. >> gregg: elizabeth, thanks. >> authorities investigating the death of a texas district attorney have charged a former justice of the peace with making a terrorist threat. he is in police custody. his home was searched as part of the investigation. williams has not been named a susp
borders this is about legislation we got in pakistan against sexual harassment these laws were passed in 2010 and i will tell you why it was so important. one reason was after years of militancy women were being pushed back in the last decade and a half and this was the first come back and they regained their public space and their workspace so that was widely celebrated throughout the country the other reason was we had a long gap of legislation and pakistan and i don't count the small laws that modify a little something but the last progressive legislation was in the mid-50s. switch has been a very long time and now it opened of space for women so it was good for pakistan and it also opened doors for many other programs of legislation just because that magical chemistry open the doors and we were able to get seven program in legislation passed over the last few years and i was a big breakthrough for us and looking back as to how little started, that is the other part of the story which the book is about and that is my own story is in idle biographical case study that i have a pen do
like regular order and the rule of law. four quick questions. let me ask you first, section four 99 of title 49 p.m. u.s. code, sketches or really defines law-enforcement personnel as individuals of a rise to to carry firearms with the police power of arrest and identifiable by appropriate markings of a 40 so with sequestration and the debt crisis in mind and you talked about sequestration a lot today should federal agencies spend federal funds on law-enforcement uniforms for federal employees that do not meet this definition in our law, yes or no? >> i don't know enough about the topic. >> do you believe that the federal agencies follow the law? >> absolutely the federal agencies are following the lot in how they're implementing the sequestered. >> are there spending cuts, spending practices consistent with federal law? >> we worked with agencies, agency leadership, the guiding principle is mission first. as agencies implement the difficult sequester cuts they're putting their mission first and foremost. individual decisions are up to the agencies. the questions you have, we can di
the person is. there is no positive i.d. we expect more details at a briefing from law enforcement in an hour and will bring that live. we've learned the identity of the third victim killed in the attack, lindsay liu. the school confirmed her identity earlier this afternoon. 8-year-old martin richard and 29-year-old krystle campbell were also killed in the horrible bombings. 178 people were injured and at least 100 have been released from area hospitals. i'm joined by john king and cnn analyst. juliet, start with you. you are a former homeland security official. what are you hearing on the latest of the developments especially when it comes to this individual who was spotted on videotape? >> essentially what you said, you know, that the idea they would have a name that soon seemed way too quick for someone in custody unless he was well known to law enforcement already or was under surveillance. right now this is exactly how you would expect an investigation to unfold. there will now be -- trying to figure out what his name is but, jake, the key is what are they going to say at 5:00? we should
immigration law-breakers and reward them with the object of their crime. and senator ted cruz, republican in the senate, was just as harsh. let's listen to what he has to say. >> if we pass something that allowed those here illegally to achieve citizenship, it means you're a chump for having stayed in your own country and following the rules. >> your response? >> the existing law allows people illegally access to citizenship. it says you have to go back to your country of birth and you have to wait for ten years and apply for it. all we've done is create an alternative. and it's going to be longer, more expensive and more difficult to navigate. it would be cheaper if they went back home, waited ten years and applied for a green card. secondly, we're not awarding anything. all we're giving people the opportunity to eventually do is gain access to the same legal immigration system, the same immigration process that will be available to everybody else. and number three, in exchange for all of that, we're going to get the toughest enforcement measures in the history of this country. we're goi
of this unfold. but let's bring in our law enforcement analyst here with us in boston. julia, come on over here. >> all right. >> let's talk first of all about john king's reporting substantial progress in the criminal investigation here in boston, significant development. we don't know what that progress is. but you know what, john is joining us on the phone right now. so let's talk to john. john, go ahead and tell us what you can. >> wolf, i'm on my way to you now. i want to report some breaking news information from two sources. one is a boston law enforcement source who tells me they believe they do have a significant breakthrough in the investigation. this source is calling this substantial progress. that source declined to be more specific but said to anticipate more details later today. now, i want to give you some information -- initial information important from a second source who has been briefed on the investigation. and i am told by sources that both governor deval patrick and mayor mannino and after the boston commissioner after one of the briefings this morning went to talk to th
there are different needs in different communities? and i think perhaps the law enforcement folks feel the cultures in the communities and see that come out in the adults. i would like to hear about how do you affect a culture and even in san francisco we have many cultures affecting what is valued, what is criticized. >> you know i think that richard touched upon this. it's a relationship of power and it's clearly going to differ from community to community; right. when i was telling you i was picked because because i didn't speak english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is accep
to the hospital. that is straight off cbs. we ask average american to assist law enforcement in identifying who the bomber was. see something, say some. now we have someone who was being deported due to national security concerns, who was at the scene, he can possibly i.d. everybody, we're asking that in boston, and we had this g there, and he was detailed in the hospital, covered with blood, and that we will deport him. ofif i might, i am unaware anyone who is being deported for national security concerns at all related to boston. i do not know where -- eli >> he is being deported. >> like i said, i do not even think he was technically a person of interest or a suspect. that was a wash, and i am not aware of any proceeding there. i will clarify that, but i think this is an example of why it is so impnt leaw endo its j >> that is why i say we wouldn't you agree that it is negligent for as the administration to deport someone who was at the scene of the bombing, and we are on to deport him, not being able to question him any more? >> i am not going to answer that question. it is so full of the s
raises and don't hold themselves to the to the same laws. so to get away from these party labels. what we need to do is hold these elected officials accountable and make them do their job f. they don't do their job you vote them out. >> we will hear senator rand moment.just a mississippi senator looks ahead at work in the senate on immigration, gun control and tension in the korean peninsula. we'll talk with financial markets and community investment director from the office. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. is the >> now kentucky senator rand paul speaking to students at howard university, a black gluferte d.c. e talked about the party outreach to young people and minorities. his is about 50 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. i would like to thank the president and the faculty and the students letting me come today. people ask me are you nervous about speaking at the university, some of the students may be democrats? y response is the trip will be a success if i can get the hilltop to have a headline that ays a republican came to howard but he came i
into treatment in the first place. there is 4 l's, liver, livelihood, lover or the law. those 4 things. liver, livelihood, lover and law. within those l's is when somebody shows up in my door, someone suffering, a family member suffering who brings somebody in. when it company ms to treat we know there is different types of treatment, there is evidence base treatment. there is good evidence for it, we do it. there is evidence free treatment, there is no evidence whatsoever and there is evidence proof treatment. one of those evidence proof treatment is incarceration treatment. there was an office inspection in general report and eventually matt case became supervisor for it. i have been involved in other places. treatment in custody doesn't work. flash incarceration does not work. as far as the treatment that do work for alcoholism, alcoholism is a chronic disease like diabetes. hypertension and emphysema. when we look at outcomes for chronic disease, a landmark study for the journal medical association in 1999, showed that results for treatments were no worse or better than any other chronic
. knows nothing about the hear say rule, nothing about the law. she wonders the halls like their dead. i have seen it. it's out there and it's not right. it's unacceptable. when the hearing is over, she's denied all connection to her daughter. that is what we are talking about. >> what do you think it's going to take to make society in government to take the step towards gideon and it's what we've talked about. you have worked on this for many years? >> and the bar association that is represented today. i think we are proud of our city, whatever city might be here today. we are all proud of our city. i like this city because we get ideas here that nobody else gets. some of them are really bad. we are all friends here. right? so, our little committee, we are powerless in this culture. forget about it. we have no cloud. so our slogan is, we don't think, we do. because we don't want to study things. there are people out there studying things. so we want to a supervisor. david chu, in this city, we said here is the problem and he said that is terrible. he's a practicing lawyer and we went f
. >>> the senate is deciding about more gun control but the current laws are not being enforced >> in the real world we do nothing to enforce background checks. sglee com >> reporter: each year the same story, tens of thousands people denied guns but only a handful prosecuted. the report shows only 44 prosecution and the person who compiled the numbers says about a quarter of those were overturned and many more didn't warrant prosecution. >> there are other circumstances where you are not allowed to have a gun even though there is no crime like a protective order. >> reporter: they focus on the most serious cases at the federal level and work with states local and tribal partners to insure cases receiver the attention they deserve. >> failing a background check is is not a federal offense but lying on one is illegal. the data didn't show how many people were not telling the truth. >>> president obama is turning the talk over to a mother whose child was killed in the newton shootings. they have been meeting with lawmakers to encourage their support for gun control legislation. >>> a bill addres
>> good evening i am the director of the yale law library and i'm here to welcome you to the book talk series. i also want to thank the federalist society for cosponsoring tonight's top. it features logan beirne the author of the new book of the book "blood of tyrants" george washington and the forging of the presidency. this began as a paper while a law student it was written under the supervision of william s. courage. after working two years in the law firm logan returned to the yale law school in 2010 as a scholar and began to turn the paper into the book that you see tonight appropriately we have professor estrich with us to comment on the book. he is a highly distinguished member of the yale law school factory and covering of wide range of legal topics and of previous book talk series. according to recently published ready the professor is one of the most known legal scholars in the universe just one or two others have been cited more than him. that was probably of mistakes. [laughter] he is dynamic and innovative teacher and wonderful for young scholars like logan. so now i
more winning videos go to student cam.org. laws and forum on gun he second amendment. on "newsmakers" california congressman chairman of the armed services committee. he talks about the proposed defense budget and takes questions on north korea. >> how should the u.s. respond if they do another ballistic missiles test? -- n't want to second yes the commander in chief is going to make the decision. the military will give him options. i'm not the president. i don't have that responsibility and i don't want to get out in front of any decisions that he might make. i do think and i've said this fore, not just on this instance, i think we have to be careful about setting red lines and moving them and moving them. >> right. >> that has happened in the past, not with just this administration but in the past. but when you do that you encourage people to move forward. i compare nations to individuals. i was just meeting with some of our top military leaders and i asked them if any of them had children. of course, they all have. i said did the children ever push you and they all do. that's huma
moving forward and i have had many conversations with superintendents and law enforcement officials as well about how we can address this data integrity issue and how a school won't be hoisted by their own petard because they had the courage to collect the data when other schools kind of look the other way. so, again, it's a hard question to answer in ways that are other than anecdote. there have been survey data and things of that nature, but i feel uncomfortable saying unequivocally this is what we know, these are the trends. i like to be evidence based and i'm not sure the evidence allows that. >> roslyn, challenges to you and secretary duncan. >> for the first time you can see data for the first time about the -- discipline and students referred to law enforcement, suspensions more than once. on the bullying and harassment we are also collecting for the first time ever data on the number of incidents of students disciplined for bullying and harassment. they are not exactly reliable. lots of folks aren't collecting this. our collection is at the school level so you could go
-- there is nothing republican or democrat about law enforcement or about law enforcement saving people's lives. we should resolve to go forward as one country. i have been working on this issue for many years. and i helped to author and support connecticut's first assault weapons ban in the early 1990's. it wonto court to defend a was challenge constitutionally. argued in the trial, and then of the state supreme court to uphold law. i have worked with law enforcement colleagues for three decades. know that they support these measures. the state and local police are -- [unintelligible] support high-capacity magazines. because they know those are the weapons of war. to outgune criminals them. they put their lives at risk. so i listened to my colleagues and law-enforcement tell me we need to do something about gun violence. i listened to the people of connecticut who say can't we do something about the guns? i respect the rights of gun owners, the second amendment is a lot of the land, and none of these proposals would take guns responsibleands of and lawful gun owners. but there are some people who
that submissions of mental health records into the system are not prohibited by federal privacy law. requiring background checks for firearm sales. this section requires that context for sales at gun shows and online while requiring aspects of second amendment rights for law enforcement. tidal theory is the national commission on massive violence. is the national commission on mass violence. it looks at all aspects of the problem, including school safety his guns, mental health and violent media or video games. the bill will not take away anyone's's guns. the bill will not ban any type guns.e arms -- anyone's the bill will not create a national registry. it makes it illegal to establish in such a registry. uponill will not infringe the constitutional rights of law-abiding citizens. manchin-toomey bill. the senate will be voting on whether or not to continue the debate today. for republicans, 202-585-3880 for democrats, and 202-585-3882 for independences. president obama says, this is not my bill. i would like certain aspects to be stronger. it represents a bipartisan progress and recognizes th
not think any legislation really is going to fix the whole entire problem. mentioned new york's safe law -- what do you think about that? senate andhink the assembly in the new york kind of rushed into this legislation. the governor touting that around the state am a it really brought a lot of people out of the as far as sheriffs department and all of that across new york state. i see a real interest in battling this legislation because they feel it will impede our rights. it is going to make it very costly. host: let's take a look at "the new york post." they have this spread -- it says chuck schumer praised to efforts of newtown kin move the gun debate forward. you see relatives of sandy hook victims. let's hear from another new york state caller. springfield gardens, on our independent line. caller: good morning. , i believe mrs. obama went to chicago to make a speech. i heard parts of the speech. it was very moving. the problem with the speech is that it is four years late. violence in that community, or they have had violence in that community, for years. now the obama administratio
in there educating myself about the law, i know is fast to get in there, but when the wheels are turned to come home, it's slow. i couldn't accept it. people are like they are going to do this to time. i said no, this is clear. this was what was supposed to have been done from the beginning. even my families, my loved wupz ones that lost. that made me fight more. i never gate gave up my fate. my hope is restored. >> with that i would like to thank all of our panelist. thank you. [ applause ] and we are now going to move to our second panel. while they take their seats, this idea of forced treatment versus constitutional rights has always been a tension that we've had in our criminal justice system. there is an issue that came up earlier this year that you may have read about involving this implementation of a court that was supposed to treat individuals who were suffering from long-term alcoholism. and the court was set up in a way where individuals were not being arrested for a crime but instead were being jailed for contempt of court as long as 120-150 days in jail. my office, when we learned of
or particularly polarizing issues, but because i believe in it. i believe that laura's law outpatient treatment is a tool among many tools that we have in the mental health system to try to engage people in a recovery based way. the foundation of laura's law is a multidisciplinary team trying to engage people, trying to give them as much say in the treatment plan as they are willing to provide and when you read the description in nevada county that has it fully implemented. when you meet the people who work they are, they believe in the same things that mr. vega was mentioning, love kindness, i think that's why we all do this work but there are individuals like my mother, maybe like his son who need a little bit of extra help. i think that sometimes oftentimes clients see judges differently than they see their doctors. they are more line listening to judges than their doctors and than can be a very effective push into treatment, and that sometimes not pushing them in that way prevents them from getting into treatment in the beginning. what i found is that that is the first step to recovery. onc
cases against that school discipline, but holly has come up with a really wonderful solution within law enforcement that we would love you to talk about and it's preventive and solution. >> thank you. it's not going to be a shock to you that i don't have a sizzle reel but i did manage to get a few powerpoint slides in so it's a good thing if i can get my next one. can you advance it for me please? so it is a safety course that i created with yahoo. we partnered together. i started asking questions the first day so my boots are on the ground and i'm in the schools and i love doing what i do, and i believe wholeheartedly and i believe it was the soft power -- yes, i love it. i think it's effective in so many ways, so i had luckily teamed up with the right people at yahoo who were really amazing and just the foresight they saw, and believed in the concept that law enforcement needs to be a piece of this puzzle and have some solutions. we have a unique part in the schools and with kids and this did get certified for the peace officer standards and we get credit for that being police
some restrictions, but you guys are fantastic at bringing in laws. so, maybe you can create some kind of law. you're so good at that. you would be the country to start that, i would be quite certain. we have to go about 10 steps through parliament and it takes 20 years to change a law. i think you can do it overnight. [laughter] >> well, maybe. thank you. (applause) >> we have another answer. >> if i might very quickly. >> yes, of course. >> i have worked with aerosol with youth on murals as well as individual projects. i've also done collage. we've done paint pens. we have used a number of different things from silk screen t-shirts to making logos. my experience with these youth is you might engage them through graffiti. you don't have to use arrow zoll. it's expensive. it's anywhere from 8 to $14 a can wherever you get it. and you also have to then worry about protecting the eyes, the hands and the proper respirator which could be 35 to $50 apiece per youth. so, to me it's a really expensive way to engage that graffiti side of the artistic or creative behavior. at the same time, mon
this. the law is so complicated and if it is not done right the first time, it is just going to get worse. toup this worse, it is beyond comprehension. invite senator rockfeller to come on the program and he decollide. but we got in statement. he is strong in his belief that the law will do good for many millions of americans. when it is fully implement indeed 2014 it will be the first time such ape sweeping health reform law goes into affect. but they wanted to encourage the administration to get ahead . challengeless so that implementation goes smoothly as possible. >> maybe hotdogs earlier statements were more candid than comfortable. or maybe, maybe he got a late night phone call from valerie jar ed. not one democrat ran on a platform on obama care and i can't imagine that anyone would next year. it is popular as being prepped for a colon oscopey. honesty about obama care is not popular. when they explain how it caused prices to up. they get savaged by left wing actvist and companies like hobby lobby opt out of the procedures because of moral principle. they are sue fined millio
this story and telling it in the right place and the right time can be very effective. so seth's law does require that if you witness an act of bullying, that you must report it. >> is that for anybody? >> anyone, but particularly teachers. there is a -- sometimes we see things that aren't very pleasant and if you've ever taken it to muni, you know what i mean. your tendency is to turn away. i heard the word faggot on the play ground when i taught. the teachers were intimidated, they didn't want to be seen to have any empathy because that might reflect on them. it's crazy but that's part of the oppression. when we started to work on the legislation, i tried to channel myself back in the classroom, i taught for a number of years. we're hoping seth's law is the first of many. in addition to their reporting you also have to document, we feel like this is the science of it which, you know, sounds a little sterile when you consider the emotional loss, but that you document each incident as it happens so you have a record and you also look at the climate, the culture, and also the perpetr
the law, but about the wisdom of going through with the death penalty, and throughout its history and in the united states supreme court from the 1960s on that we found, justices would vote to uphold the death sentence even though they felt it was wrong. they felt the democracy, this is the decision that the people must make, and state legislature must make, and -- >> host: i thought the research you did, and the willie francis case was interesting, and you went into the gas chambers and the electric chair. what was the experience like, you know -- >> guest: no death row inmate sat in as many electric chairs as we have. it is -- it reminds you of what capital punishment is about that in this room, a life is being taken away by the state, and you think about a little more deeply. incidentally, there's so many questions, and once you decide to do it, what are the rules, those questions turned out to be more difficult. we can't say that our book provides you the answer, but i think we agree it helps you understand the question. >> i think there's two -- i call them knee jerk theories
said you should start enforce the law on the books not pass more laws that would not stop criminals. christina said you're turning our country to the most violent country on earth. enact it now. we should be concerned with the national death and knot korea and not gun control. again, it's hashtag guncontrol. we will bring you reaction from house speaker john john boehner at 1:15 eastern during the weekly legislative briefing. house minority leader namp nancy pelosi. while the break is diswrurndway in the senate. we'll go back to earlier today and look at the debate beginning with connecticut senator blumenthal during the remarks referred to the parents of victims of the new town shooting in the senate today. as debate was underway. >> mr. president, thank you. we are on the verge of a historic vote that will determine whether we make america safer and assure that we do everything possible as senators and citizens to ensure there are no more newtowns. on the evening of december 14, when we left the fire house at sandy hook, there was a vigil at a church in newtown, saint rose of lima
and thank you for your service overseas as well. we have just gotten this, a bulletin from law enforcement. people being asked to be on the lookout for a darker skinned or black male with a black backpack and a black sweatshirt, possible foreign national, accent unclear, what the accent of the individual is, but believes to have some sort of an accent. we are just getting that information. john king is working his sources now. he joins us with the latest on the investigation. john, what are you hearing? >> well, that bolo, shorthanded police lingo for be on the lookout, just issued. i will give you reporting from all of our cnn team. a little more on that bolo. law enforcement is looking for a darker skinned or black male with a black backpack, possible foreign national because of an accent. the bolo notes to law enforcement officials says five minutes before the first explosion, this individual attempted to gain entry to a restricted area and when turned away, he broke eye contact and pulled his sweatshirt and hood over his head. no further info on him is what the bolo says. this is law e
right now has been a nightmare for federal and local law enforcement. the leaks that came out today should be an embarrassment. i'm certain that they are. there may be a couple of meetings going on with the chief of police in boston whose department tweeted out information about an arrest today which was completely erroneous. this has been embarrassing for law enforcement at the wrong time. >> so it wasn't the a.p., it was the tweet and the a.p. picked up the tweet? >> yes, the police department apparently tweeted out some information about an arrest. >> bob, talk to me about that and the fact that they still have made considerable progress, have they not, since the terror attack occurred. a lot of people didn't think that they would have a person of interest either in custody or even an image of that person by this point. >> well, since 9/11, the department of homeland security and law enforcement at large has really taken some really tremendous strides and using technology to be able to assist law enforcement, the cameras, surveillance cameras, all those things become part of this
and we decided that we would call it seth's law in honor of her, she had been in and around sacramento for a long time. so the legislation in and of itself, i don't think it's going to work miracles, but it is definitely on people's radar now and i think you hear it in the media more and more. the reason we have a suicide barrier and the reason we are having legislation like this is because of the parents and the families because they are the ones that hurt the most and i would imagine part of the therapeutic thing, you've got to tell this story and telling it in the right place and the right time can be very effective. so seth's law does require that if you witness an act of bullying, that you must report it. >> is that for anybody? >> anyone, but particularly teachers. there is a -- sometimes we see things that aren't very pleasant and if you've ever taken it to muni, you know what i mean. your tendency is to turn away. i heard the word faggot on the play ground when i taught. the teachers were intimidated, they didn't want to be seen to have any empathy because that might refle
with local law enforcement who had gone into schools talking about bullying, including cyber bullying and giving people concrete examples of things of situations they saw, it was remarkable. and that is why we will continue to do that work. so i hope today as we move forward you will understand that we are in this together with you at the department of justice. this is an all hands on deck enterprise. there is so much to do. i hope at the end of this day we will indeed all follow the lead of that student, walk out and say what are one or two things i'm going to do differently and better? how are we going to improve this situation? i hope if you take one and only one thing from melinda and my and ruslyn's remarks today, if you have an idea, please bring them to us. we want to learn from you. we are in this together and i want to say thank you because the most important thing we have is a recognition that you understand that this is indeed a national issue for us to deal with. i'm looking forward to the rest of the day, i appreciate your presence and i appreciate your leadership
and so i listen to my colleagues anand law enforcement becoming e need to do something about gun violence. i listen to the people of newtown who say, can't we do something about the guns? and i respect the rights of gun owners, the second amendment is the law of the land, and none of these proposals would take guns out of the hands of responsible and lawful gun owners. but there are some people who should not have them. there are some guns that should not be in use, and there are some weapons of war, high-capacity magazines that should not be sold in this country. in more than half of the mass killings, high-capacity magazines enabled the shooting that occurred so rapidly and so easily, and newtown the changing of a magazine by the shooter enabled children to escape. in tucson, the killing of a nine year old girl, christina taylor, by the 13th bullet, would not have happened if that magazine had been limited to 10 rounds because the shooter was tackled as he tried to change magazines. the high-capacity magazine enabled adam lanza to fire 154 bullets in five minutes. so these kind
our neighbors and friends and families and so to protect the rights of the law abiding citizen of kentucky i will impose cloture. >> and another top democrat said it is a struggle to get the 60 votes. >> the ira will try to throw all kinds ofs - amendments at us. >> the first one is backed up by pat toomey and joe manchin. it would expand background checks on gun shows and internet sales. >> the measure to make it harder for violent crim nams and to get guns. that is common sense. >> the gun group came out against the amendment. lawmakers are facing pressure from family members of those killed in newtown connecticut and other relatives pushing for a new assault weapon's bands. >> they ripped through someone's body and they leave baseball size holes in somebody's skin and this is not okay. >> across the capitol for now. house leaders are waiting to see what the senate is able to accomplish. >> i fully expect the house will act. but it is to make a blanket commitment without knowing what the underlying deal is, is irresponsible on my part. look at the families that worked so hard
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